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Capital Views

Bytown in 1853\nCredit: Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. 1992-675-2\n\nBefore becoming a city in 1855, Ottawa was referred to as Bytown. The view pictured is of Barracks Hill, the future site of Parliament Hill. Construction of Centre Block\nCredit: J.B. Reid, Library and Archives Canada, C-010079\n\nThe cornerstone of Centre Block was laid in 1860. The Library of Parliament, pictured here, was under construction for 16 years. Beginning of new session in 1914\nCredit: Library and Archives Canada, PA-023306\n\nPeople gathered together outside of the original Centre Block building for the opening of a session of Parliament. Fire of 1916\nCredit: J.B. Reid, Library and Archives Canada, C-010079\n\nOn February 3rd, 1916 Centre Block was almost entirely destroyed by fire. The fire began in the Reading Room and left only the Library of Parliament and a portion of the North West wing still standing. Reconstruction of Centre Block\nCredit: Library and Archives Canada, PA-130624\n\nReconstruction of Centre Block begins after the fire of 1916. The Senate and the House of Commons continued to sit, using the Victoria Memorial Museum Building as a temporary meeting space. Reconstruction of Centre Block\nCredit: Topley Studio Fonds  Library and Archives Canada PA-033993\n\nThe new Centre Block of Parliament was completed in 1922. However, it took an additional five years to complete the Peace Tower. New flag ceremony in 1965\nCredit: Duncan Cameron/ Library and Archives Canada, 1970-015 NPC\n\nThe Canadian flag was flown for the first time during a ceremony on Parliament Hill on February 15th, 1965. Signing of the <i>Constitution Act of 1982</i>\nCredit: Robert Cooper/ Library and Archives Canada, e008300499\n\nHer Majesty Queen Elizabeth II signed the <i>Constitution Act</i>, 1982 on Parliament Hill. East Block\nCredit: Copyright Library of Parliament / Karen Cooper\n\nThe East Block stands a short distance from Centre Block. A statue of former Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier stands in the foreground. Sir John A. Macdonald’s office in East Block\nCredit: Copyright Library of Parliament / Mone Cheng\n\nEast Block once housed the office of the Governor General and the Prime Minister. The office of Canada’s first Prime Minister has been restored to its former glory. West Block\nCredit: Copyright Library of Parliament / W.J.L. Gibbons\n\nWest Block stands a short distance from Centre Block and directly across from East Block. The building also appears on the $5 bill. Canada Day\nCredit: Copyright Library of Parliament / Mone Cheng\n\nCrowds gather on Parliament Hill at dusk on Canada Day, eager to listen to the concert and see the fireworks. Ceremonial Guard\nCredit: Copyright Library of Parliament / Mone Cheng\n\nThe Ceremonial Guard performs the Changing of the Guard ceremony on Parliament Hill in front of hundreds of spectators. Centennial Flame\nCredit: Copyright Library of Parliament\n\nThe Centennial Flame was put in place to commemorate Canada’s centennial in 1967. Visitors to Parliament Hill often throw coins in the fountain that surrounds the flame. Aboriginal man on Victoria Island\nCredit: Copyright Ottawa Tourism\n\nAn Aboriginal man provides a demonstration and cultural interpretation on Victoria Island. Parliament Hill\nCredit: Copyright Library of Parliament / Mone Cheng\n\nA view of Parliament as the sun sets. Cycling next to the Rideau Canal\nCredit: Copyright Ottawa Tourism\n\nVisitors take advantage of the bike path along the Rideau Canal, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Kayaking on the Rideau Canal\nCredit: Copyright Ottawa Tourism\n\nAmongst the many activities available to Ottawa residents and tourists alike is kayaking or canoeing on the Rideau Canal. Family on Parliament Hill\nCredit: Copyright Ottawa Tourism\n\nA family enjoys a snowy day on Parliament Hill. Touring Parliament\nCredit: Copyright Ottawa Tourism\n\nStudents head to Parliament Hill, the seat of Canada’s government, for a guided tour. Parliament Hill\nCredit: Copyright Library of Parliament / Mone Cheng\n\nThe river behind Parliament Hill at a particularly still and quiet time.